Thomas Markwell -Innkeeper & Coaching Operator 

Page last updated 25/03/2011

Please Help...

This is a website  that is in the process of being developed with  information about  Heritage & History in the Hartley Valley,  and needs assistance and input from other researchers.

Contact us

 

 Thomas himself died in 1841, however carved on the top of his vault in St. Peter's Churchyard, in addition to his own name and details is the inscription -- "Thomas Markwell died 15/7/1829 aged 37". This second Thomas Markwell would have been born about the year 1792, so could have been a son born to him in the Colony but not one left behind in England.

There is no record of his baptism and no record of his burial at St. Peter's on that date. In fact there is no record of any male aged 37 of any name being buried at St. Peter's on that date.

It certainly puzzled Mr. Mutch who had evidently read the inscription on the vault in the churchyard and he made a notation in his records to that effect even though he could not make a corresponding entry to say where the second Thomas Markwell had been buried. There is no Thomas Markwell 'dying' in the Colony in 1829 according to the records held by the Registrar General either. The only possible explanation can be that the person concerned was raised under his Mother's name, but Thomas senior nevertheless acknowledged him as his son.

Mr. Mutch also comments on the fact that Thomas and Maria also appear to change the name of their eldest son George Thomas, as he appears in the Marriage Register as Thomas George Markwell and continues to appear this way for the remainder of his life. However, the child was listed as Thomas Markwell in the 1828 Census so the death of the other person in 1829 cannot have been the reason for Thomas and Maria changing the name of their son.

Thomas George Markwell. 

 

Thomas Markwell was born in Essex London in 1771 and was 20 years old when found guilty of theft of clothing to the value of  £2.8s.6d. He was convicted at

Chelmsford, Essex Assizes on the 23rd March 1787. It was alleged in the indictment that about midnight on 11th November, 1786, Thomas broke into the dwelling house of Arthur Heron situated in the parish of Walkham Cross and stole a number of items of clothing to the value of two pounds eight shillings and sixpence. Thomas was sentenced to death but Judge Knappe gave him a reprieve and substituted a sentence of transportation for 14 years in the colony of NSW.  Thomas Markwell arrived in 1790 to serve his sentence of 14 years transportation. He was assigned as a servant to Thomas Spencer at Richmond and was given his ticket of leave in 1806.  Thomas was employed by Thomas Spencer who was farming 130 acres at Richmond. Thomas Spencer had also arrived in the Colony on the "Scarborough", however, he had come on the first voyage that the vessel made to the Colony, as a marine with the First Fleet.

 

Thomas Markwell  arrived in 1790 in Australia on board one of the ships of the Second Fleet, the Scarborough, onboard the same ship was Edward Field  sailing out as a member of the NSW Corp.

 

In 1806 he soon gained prosperity and became the owner of sizable holdings around Agnes Banks. 

In 1821 he was given  a grant of land  in the Nepean  District on 50 acres of land  on the Castlereagh Road, given by Gov Macquarie in 1821. Markwell had received two grants of 50 acres, which by the 1828 census about a third was under cultivation. Unusually, Markwell also had 100 head of cattle and 700 sheep.

 

In 1807 at the age of 37  he married Maria Cheshire who was 15 years old at the time and 7 months pregnant.  Thomas had been in the colony for 17 years by now and ready to settle down to raising a family.  It was common for  the more established settler to take such a young bride.    They travelled from the Hawkesbury to Sydney with Maria being 7 months pregnant  for the ceremony with Rev Henry Fulton  performing the ceremony.  During the first 3 years of their marriage 2 children were born – Sophie in 1807 and Elizabeth in 1809.  Maria left Thomas and was not reconciled with him for another 14 years.  At that time there were many traumas with  floods and a major flood in 1809 which may have had a bearing on their relationship.  They were married on the 5th October 1807  at St.Phillip's Sydney.

 

Maria had been born in the Colony on 1/8/1792 and was the daughter of two convicts, Thomas Cheshire who had arrived on the "Neptune" in 1790 and Ann Teasdale who had come on the "Lady Julianna" the same year.

 

The 1828 Census  listed  Thomas as a  farmer at Richmond holding 30 cleared acres,  cleared. He had 9 horses, 100 cattle and 700 sheep. He had in his employ John Peathon (or Peathcon) and James Whitby, both convicts and neither of whom would explain the mystery person buried in his vault. The farm of Thomas Markwell was located in the area later called Yarramundi.

 

In 1824 at the age of 31, once again Maria bore another daughter Ellen.  In 1826 their first son was born- Thomas, then John was born in 1828 .  Another daughter  Mary Ann was born in 1830. Then suddenly when Mary Ann was only one month old Maria passed away leaving  Thomas aged 53  with 4 small children under the age of seven.

 

His first daughters by this time was much older and no doubt helped their father with the upbringing of the younger children.   Elizabeth born in 1809 at this time was aged and Sophie  born in 1807 was aged had married  Henry Hewitt in April 1825 when her parent became reconciled. 

Thomas died on 18/9/1841 aged 70 years.

 

Thomas George Markwell 2nd  who was born on 27th September 1826  and a the age  of 18,   married on the  16th January, 1844 to Ann Esther Williams also aged 18 . Anne’s well known farming family was based in the Hawkesbury and  one of the first settlers to take stock over the range to the Liverpool Plains with George Cheshire.

 

The Markwells later settled in the area of  Wollombi.

 

 

George’s  Cheshires father Thomas,   aged 23 years old, also arrived in Australia in 1790 and came out with Joseph Perry charged with highway robbery for which they were sentenced to death, but commuted to transportation..  

 

At Yarramundi near Richmond, Thomas Cheshire  was murdered in 1824 aged 63 at the Markwells home after disturbing burglars. .George Cheshire’s sister was Maria who had married Thomas Markwell in 1807.

 

Thomas Markwell 2nd  had  8 children  - 4 daughters and 4 sons.  Eldest son Thomas George  was born in 1845.

 

Thomas at the age of 36 held the license for Rose Inn for 12 years from 1862 till 1870 when Edward Field took over the license. Thomas was 48 when he left the Inn business and the effect of changing circumstance due to Cobb and Co may have had an influence on the departure. He certainly was very wealthy due to the impact of the gold seekers travelling to the gold fields using his coaches and stopping at his Rose Inn.

He sold his hauling business and opened an inn called the Golden Fleece in Brickfield Hill in 1856

Golden Fleece, George-street, from Elisabeth Coulton to T. G. Markwell.Thursday 25 December 1856

 

The inn became knows as Markwell's Golden Fleece.    He used this venue's convenient location  to get staff for   Thomas’s brother John Markwell  Inn called the Butchers Arms Inn . He held a pub in Richmond and also had a house that he leased out on the  main Yarramundi road.  John & Thomas went to Mr Hogsfles’s school  with Mr Alfred Smith who published his recollections and memories in 1909.  "John met an unfortunate end for he was found dead in the bush .  He went out for a load of wood and had it on and made a pot of tea.  He must have dropped dead or passed away very easily for he was found next morning resting with head on his arms near his billy.  His horses were standing there with the load on the dray and must have had a rough time standing all that time"

 

 But in 1859 Thomas decided to  transfer his family up to Hartley and run the Rose Inn.

Wednesday 28 September 1859  TO LET, that commodious PUBLIC-HOUSE, and premises, situate on Brickfield-hill, Sydney, known as the " Golden Fleece," at present occupied by Mr. Markwell. There are extensive stables, very large yard, and every convenience for teams. Possession will be given on the 1st of January next. For particulars apply to G. IV. GRAHAM, solicitor, 6, Elizabeth-street.

T O LET, the SHOP, DWELLING-HOUSE, and   premises, on Brickfield-hill, Sydney, at present occupied by Mr. Watson, chemist, ifcc., three doors south of Goulburn-street. Possession will be given on the 1st of January next. Apply to G. W. GRAHAM, solicitor, C, Elizabeth -street, Sydney.

_____________________________________________________________

The Gold Rush was on and the prospect of  west was enticing.

Tuesday 20 December 1859

WOODS' American Coach leaves MARKWELL's, Golden Fleece, Brickfield-hill, for Bathurst, on WEDNESDAY next, at 6 a.m. Fare £1 10s. Only four days on the road._At the Publicans meeting of Friday 14 December 1860 the notice was given of the following:

The license granted to Thomas George Markwell, for a house in George-street, was cancelled, on proof that he abandoned that house as his usual place of abode

The next we know Thomas was advertising his relocation  to Little Hartley.

On Friday 25 January 1861 an advertisement appeared:

ROSE INN, LITTLE HARTLEY.-THOMAS G. MARKWELL, late of the Golden Fleece, George-street, near the Haymarket, Sydney, begs to "return, thanks to his numerousus friends and supporters for their past favour while In .business in Sydney, and to Inform them that he has reamed from Sydney to Little Hartley, and has taken the above old established business as a first-class family and commercial Hotel, and solicits the patronage of gentlemen in the interior visiting Little Hartley or travelling to Sydney.

The proprietor enters into the Rose Inn with the fullest confidence in his ability to give satisfaction to those he may have the honor to entertain. The stables are commodious and airy, and are under the management of an experienced and careful groom, and are well supplied with hay and corn of the best description.

Large and commodious cattle yards arranged well for the purpose of stock travelling to market.

January 22nd.

Thomas was  only settled into his Rose Inn  six months, when he was the subject of a controversial mishap.

EXTRAORDINARY AND FATAL OCCURRENCE AT HARTLEY.-We have received from our correspondent at Hartley a lengthy report of an inquest held on the body of one Gerald Hunt, at Mr. Thomas George Markwells, Rose Inn, Little Hartley, on Friday, the 14th instant, from which we extract the following facts :-It appears that Gerald Hunt, a man about 27 years of age, and supposed to be an American, who had been living for some weeks and still continued in the employment of Mr. Markwell, on the afternoon of the 12th became very excitable and threatened to do bodily injury to his master ; to prevent which, as well as to prevent him from injuring others, Mr. Markwell locked him up in the stable. In a short time, Hunt, having climbed up from the manger, made his appearance at the loft window and leaped into the yard, in. a state of greater excitement than before, threatening vengeance upon Mr. Markwell. Ile was then forced back into the stable, and locked up with his hands tied together in a horse-box. He was released about two hours afterwards by Mr. Mark well's groom, Thomas Hughes, who found him asleep. On coining out of the stable, he made n rush at an axe that was lying near the wood-heap, but was prevented from get- ting it by Hughes. Being so dangerously violent, it was considered prudent to lock him up again. Accorlingly, Mr. Markwell, "William Kendall, and Hughes, once more took the infuriated man into the stable, tied his hands together with a handkerchief, passed a rope between his arms, and with it, when the door of the horse-box was closed, drew him close to the door, and fastened the rope on the outside. Thus secured, the unhappy man was left to chew the cud of reflection till a constable, who was then sent for to take him to the lock-up, should arrive. Ten minutes after- wards, Markwell and Kendall returned to the stable, and to their horror found the man dead ! A verdict of manslaughter was returned against Thomas George Markwell and William Kendall, who were then com-mitted to take their trial at the assizes to be held in September next at Bathurst. Bail allowed. The actual cause of death has not transpired.-Bathurst Times.

Saturday 29 June 1861

 

EXTRAORDINARY AND FATAL OCCURRENCE AT HARTLEY.-We have received from our correspondent at Hartley a lengthy report of an inquest held on the body of one Gerald Hunt, at Mr. Thomas George Markwell, Rose Inn, Little Hartley, on Friday, the nth instant, from which we extract the following facts :-It appeared that Gerald Hunt, a man about 27years of age, and supposed to be an American, who had been living for some weeks and still continued in the employment of Mr. Markwell, on the afternoon of the lath instant became very excitable, and threatened to do bodily injury to his master; to prevent which, as well as to prevent him from injuring others, Mr. Markwell locked him up in the stable. In a short time Hunt, having climbed up from the manger, made his appearance at the loft window and leaped into the yard, in a state of greater excitement than before, threatening vengeance upon Mr. Markwell. He was then forced back into the stable, and locked up, with his hands tied together, in a horse-box. He was released about two hours afterwards by Mr. Markwell's groom Thomas Hughes, who found him asleep. On coming out of the stable, he made a rush at an axe that was lying near the wood-heap, but was prevented from getting it by Hughes. Being so dangerously violent, it was considered prudent to look him up again. Accordingly Mr. Markwell, William Kendall (a painter in Markwell's employ), and Hughes, once more took the infuriated man into the stable, tied hi« hands together with a handkerchief, passed a rope between his arms, and with it, when the door of the horse-box was closed, drew him close to the door, and fastened the rope on the outside, l'hua «soured, the unhappy man was left to ohew the end of reflection till a constable, who was then sent to take him to the lookup, should arrive ten minutes afterwards Markwell and Kendall returned to the stable, and, to their horror, found the man dead ! A verdict of manslaughter was returned against Thomas George Markwell and William Kendall, who were then committed to take their trial at the assizes to be holden in September next, at Bathurst. Bail allowed. The  final cause of death has not transpired.-Bathurst Times,

June 36.

  Tuesday 2 July 1861

Extraordinary and Fatal Occurrence at Hartley.-In this case, which resulted in a verdict of manslaughter against Thomas George Markwell and William Kendall, the Attorney-General has declined to prosecute.-Correspondent of the-Bathurst Times.

 Saturday 20 July 1861

 EXTRAORDINARY AND FATAL OCCURRENCE AT HARTLEY-In this case, which resulted in a verdict of manslaughter against, Thomas George Markwell and William Kendall, the Attorney General bas declined to prosecute. We are credibly informed that there were very alight grounds for'retnrning «nob a verdict a« manslaughter in i this case, Mr. Markwell having only done what be considered best to prevent the man injuring himself or other« till the arrival of the police. Mr. Markwell's numerous friends will rejoice that this serious and un- pleasant case ha« so far terminated. There is, we understand, likely to be an action or two in the .matter.. Mr Markwell was for some years the proprietor of the "Golden Fleece," Brickfield Hill, Sydney, and is ex tensively known and universally respected, and has always born elho character of a humane and kind-hearted min. - Communicated to Bathurst Times. >

  Tuesday 23 July 1861

 

HARTLEY DISTRICT COURT

'TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER  24.

Burulu: Henry Cary, Esq., Judge.

MARKWELL. v. LYNCH.

This as on action for libel, in which the damages were laid at £200. It appeared from the pleadings that the e defendant had written a letter to Mr. Brown, the police magistrate at Hartley, complaining of the neglect of some members of Um police force, and as an instance of such neglect mentioned that the plaintiff  had " tied up a man named Charles Hunt, and kept him locked up in a horse box until he was strangled to death," of which the police took no notice. The defendant pleaded the truth of his statement in justification, and added that a coroner's jury had afterwards brought in a verdict of manslaughter against the plaintiff". He further pleaded that the communication was for the public good. The Judge, before the case was gone into, suggested a compromise, observing that the defendant must prove the truth of his statement, and could not give in evidence the verdict of the coroner's jury. His proper course would have boon to lay an information against the plaintiff, and not to write about it. It was agreed that the defendant should pay the costs and publish an apology, twice in the  Bathurst Free  Press and Times. Mr. Serjeant appeared for the plaintiff; Mr. Brenan for the defendant.

 ______________________________________________________________________________

But three days later another interesting article appeared in the Bathurst Times.

This time it was about Joseph Collit(Collett)  suing James Sherringham for repairs at the Rose Inn. It is of interest that the issuing of the License for James Sherringham is from 1853. Hence from 1860 another lease was taken up for another 5 years. Plus one more year which brings it till 1861. In the meantime James had contracted to purchase the Mt Victoria Inn from William Cummings. James Sherringham died in 1862 and Joseph Collit married his widow Martha, that year. Apparently Haynes was responsible for the lease, while Sherringham held the license.

________________________________________________________________________________

Collett v.  SHERINGHAM.

 Friday 27 September 1861

Claim, £35 for repairs of the Rose Inn, Little Hartley. The plaintiff let the inn in question to one Haines, for a term of five years, commencing July, 1850,  with the yearly rent of £50 ; Haines covenanting to keep the buildings in good repair. Some years before that term expired Haines died, and defendant married his widow. At the expiration of that lease, defendant verbally agreed to take a lease for a term of five years at £100 a-year, the lease to contain the same covenants as that to Haines. The lease was never executed, but the defendant occupied the inn for the term agreed on, and for an additional year, at the increased lent of £125. His Honor ruled, on the authority of a case in Smith's Law of Landlord and Tenant, that the plaintiff, not having executed the lease,  could not recover. Plaintiff non suited. Mr Sorjoant appeared for the plaintiff; Mr. Brenan for the defendant.

 

 

By October, Thomas Markwell was  caterin to the coaching trade .

MESSRS. CHAPMAN, FOREMAN, and ELLIOTT .

beg to inform the public that from this date their line of COACHES will leave SYDNEY for BATHURST.

LAMBING FLAT, and SOFALA, on SUNDAYS, by > the 5 p.m. train, and on TUESDAYS and THURSDAYS,-. ¡by tho 4-45 train p m. ; and BATHURST for SYDNEY

W MONDAYS, WEDNESDAYS, and FRIDAYS, at ,8 o'clock a.m., stopping one night at Markwell's Rose Inn, Little Hartley, where passengers will have the advantage of a night's rest. No night travelling.

BOOKING OFFICES.

Sydncy-Kelly's, Emu Inn, comer of George and Bathurst  Streets '

Smith's, Glaigow Arms, near the General Post Office

Bathurst-W. Chnpman's, Club House Hotel

Sofala- Mr. Foreman's, Barley Mow

Penrith-Mr. Robert Elliott's, Queen's Arms

Little Hartley-Markwell's, Rose Inn.

FARES.

,To and from Sofala and Parramatta , ; ..£1150

" Sofala and Bathurst .. .,050 " Bathurst and Parramatta,. .. 1 10 0 I " Penrith and Bathurst ,. ..17

Wednesday 9 October 1861

______________________________________________________________________________

Then the trade competition  expanded...

 

Support the Coach that keeps the Fares down,

Messrs. ELLIOTT, CHAPMAN, and FOREMAN'S

Commercial Line of COACHES.

Faro only £1 10s.

-This line of coaches studios the interest of passengers in every respect.

Good conches! good horses ! and civility! Slopping at the best hotels only. Through in two days.

The conches leave Parramatta on the arrival of the first train from Sydney, on MONDAY, WEDNESDAY, and FRIDAY MORNINGS, arriving in Bathurst at 4p.m sharp every TUESDAY, THURSDAY, and SATURDAY ; and the Club House Hotel, Bathurst, every MONDAY, WEDNESDAY, and FRIDAY, at 8 p.m , arriving in Sydney by the last train on the following evenings stopping one night at Mr. Markwell's first-class establishment, the Rose Inn, Hartley.   Booking Offices.-Kelly's, Emu Inn, Bathurst and Goerge streets, and Smith's, Glasgow Arms, George-street, near the Post Office, Sydney. , Elliott's, Queen's AvmB, Penrith.Chapman's, Club House Hotel, Bathurst. ' Foreman's Hotel, Sofala.

A branch coach to Sofala on the arrival of the coach from Sydney. Fare, 5s.

Passengers booked at KELLY'S, Emu Inn, for the Lachlan Diggings, through in four days. Faro only £1 10s._-_

ORANGE and LACHLAN DIGGINGS.-Messrs.HANRAHAN and WRIGHT will start their Express line of Coaches in connection with tho Great West- ern Royal mail coaches, on MONDAY, tho 2nd December. leaving Orange Mondays, Wednesdays, and Fridays ; and leave the Diggings on tho samo days. By this route passengers will have the advantage of travelling_ through from Orange to the Diggings in oho day, and no night, travelling.

Fares From Orange to the Lachlan Diggings, £2.

Booking Office, Sydney: Mr, J. O'BRIEN, Tattersalls.'

Bathurst: Mr. GAYNOR.

Messrs. Hanrahan and Wright's horses are well known to be first class.

___________________________________________

 

Then John Rutherford of COBB & CO made his move into the market.  He relocated his entire operations into Bathurst.

COACHING, COACHING, COACHING.

COACHES on the BATHURST LINE not to be BOUGHT OFF.

-Messrs. PERRY, ELLIOTT, MARKWELL, and CO., beg to inform their friends and the public in general that, on and after the 5th of May, they intend to commence running an Express Line of American Coaches to and from South Creek Terminus to Bathurst, three times per week, and hope, by civility and attention, together with, good coaches and horses, and superior coachmen, to obtain a share of that patronage which was formerly so liberally

To leave every MONDAY, WEDNESDAY, and FRIDAY, at 6-46 a m. train, arriving in Bathurst on TUESDAY, THURSDAY, and SATURDAY, at 4 p.m.

To leave Bathurst every MONDAY, WEDNESDAY, and FRIDAY, at 8 a.m., arriving Sydney on TUESDAY, THURSDAY, and SATURDAY, at 6-40 p.m., per train. B00KING OFFICES.

Kelly's Emu Inn, George-street Sydney.

Elliott's Queen's Arms, Penrith.

Perry's Commercial Hotel, Penrith,

Markwell's Rose Inn, Little Hartley.

Gaynor's Royal Oak, Bathurst.

N.B.-Coaches are in preparation to run to Orange, Lachlan, and Sofala. The Bathurst Coach will be driven by Mr. THOMAS B. PERRY, who ha» been so well known on that road for a number of years.

In addition to the above, the proprietors will have Coaches to meet all the trains on their arrival and departure from  SouthCreek .

PERRY, ELLIOTT, MARKWELL, and CO., coach proprietors.

 

PERRY, ELLIOTT, MARKWELL, and CO.'S

Royal Line of American Covered COACHES.

To and from Bathurst-Every MONDAY, WEDNESDAY, and FRIDAY,

Booking Office-Kelly's Emu Inn, corner of George and Bathurst  Streets

_Fare, £2._ CHEAP TRAVELLING.-

NOTICE.-Victoria Line of AMERICAN WAGGONS will load as under :

Two, for Bathurst.,,., Saturday One for Lambing Flat.

Monday Two for Goulburn., Monday

Two for Lachlan . Monday.

GEORGE FOX and SO., Express  Office 479, George Btrcct,

 

 

 TO T. BROWN, Esq., P.M., Hartley.-Sir,-We, the undersigned residents of the district of Hartley, respectfully request you may be pleased to convene a public meeting, to be holden at the Court-house, Hartley, at your earliest convenience, for the purpose of taking into consideration the railway route, or extension, from Little Blackheath to Bathurst and the westward.

We have the honour to be, Sir, your very obedient servants,

M. J. Finn T. G. Markwell Patrick Finn M. Lynch J. Walsh G. Jarvis G. Lee W. P. M Dermott,&o.

Gentlemen,-In accordance with the above requisition, I hereby convene a PUBLIC MEETING of the residents of the district of Hartley, favourable to the above, to be holden in the Court-house, on TUESDAY, the 28th instant, at 1 o'clock p.m.

THOMAS BROWN, P.M. " Hartley, 21st April._

 
 
 
 

 

 

Thomas Markwell jnr  became the son-in law of  Thomas Cheshire.

 

Thomas Markwells children's history is interesting.

 

Elizabeth married George Pitt Wood at St. Peters, Richmond and they had 17 children over the next 25 years, 7 daughters and 10 sons.

Sophia married Henry Hewitt a farmer and publiccan.

Ellen married William Farlow who ran the  Waggon and Four Horses  in a two storey building.

Thomas  married Eather Williams whose family was the first to take  stock over the mountains.

John married Frances Skuthorpe whose family became well known in horses at Scone

Mary Ann married Thomas Marsden whose family was the Rev Samuel Marsden the chaplain.

 

Another Innkeeper:

 

John Perry

Held license for Perry’s Hotel, The One Tree Hill Inn

1870-1878

1879-1881 Anne C Perry

Perrys Hotel was erected by Henry Bell in 1834 and stood near the present Post Office. Originally it was built of galvanised iron.

John Pery was charged with  highway robbery along with Thomas Cheshire was to be the father- in –law of Thomas Markwell.  John Perry was to become the father of Ann Perry who married Jospeh Collit. 

 

 

 

Sources:

freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/.../markwellthomas.html

 

 

 

Saturday 26 January 1861

ROSE INN, LITTLE HARTLEY/

THOMAS O MARKWELL,

(Late of the Golden Tleece, Geo) gi.-serect}near the Haymallet, Sydney,

BEGS to return thanks to his numerous fuends and l supporters for their past f-n our wlido m husmos» in Sydney, nnd to inform them thnt ho hns

REMOVED FROM SIDNEY

TO LITTLE HARTLEY,

And has taken the above old established business as.

A 1IRSJL CLASS FAMILY AND COMMLRCIAL

HOIEL,

And solicits the pntronago of gontlomon m the interior visiting Littlo Hartley'or travelling to Sydney

Tho proprietor enters into the Roso Inn with tho fid lest confidence ia Ins abdity to give satisfaction to those ho may ha\c tho honour to enteitnm 'lho Btublcs aro commodious and airy, and aro under tho management of an experienced and caroful groom, mid aro well supplied with hoy nnd coin of tho best dcsciiption

Largo and commodious cnttlo y unis arranged well for tho purpOBo of stock travelling td market

January 22nd 90

 

 

 

 

Thomas Markw ell arrived in 1790 to serve a sentence of 14 years

transportation. Markw ell received tw o grants of 50 acres, w hich by the 1828

census about a third was under cultivation. Unusually, Markw ell also had 100

head of cattle and 700 sheep.

  

John Markwell Innkeeper - Butchers Arms Inn

Wednesday 7 February 1855

SERIOUS ACCIDENT.-A serious accident happened on the night (as it is supposed) of yesterday, to Mr. John  Markwell  of Richmond. The unfortunate young man was found early this morning (Thursday), in the bush, about two miles from his home, in a state of insensibility, with severe contusions about his forehead and other parts of his body, and weltering in his blood. His horse lay by  his side, dead. As nothing could be learnt from Mr. Markwell as to the cause of the accident, he being at present unable to speak, it is only conjectured that he must have been jumping his horse over a stump when the animal fell, and occasioned the fearful catastrophe under the effects of which he is now suffering. We regret to state that Mr. M. lies in a very precarious state, though there are hopes of his recovery.-Herald's Windsor Correspondent.

 

 

 

Tuesday 23 September 1856  

10 Splendid Draught Horses..

BURT, HASSALL, and C0. are instructed:to sell by auction, at the Bazaar, on WEDNESDAY, the 1st October,10 very splendid draughthorses, the property of Mr Thos.  Markwell, Richmond, who is about to relinquish the carrying business.' The' auctioneers are warranted in stating. that, no finer or better draught horses (in every respect) have been offered in the Sydney market for a long period ; they are all in splendid condition, fit for any amount of work, and go either in teams or singly in shafts, with Druitt Street trials.

Horse Bazaar, 155, Pitt and 134, Castlereagh-streets, Sydney.

Established, 1847.