The Hartley Inn  - John Tindale 
       
 

John Tindale

Following a marriage breakup, in  February 1849 John Tindale put the Hartley Inn up for lease., but by May he still had no takers and was suggesting that the inn would make a good Country Store. In July 1849 the Inn was taken over by .......... ________________________________________________________

TO LET, the HARTLEY  INN, at Hartley, containing sixteen spacious rooms, with detached kitchen, and possessing every possible requisite for a first-rate Inn, and has been occupied as such since it was erected. viz about ten years ; has an excellent twelve stall stable, a good garden, with paddocks and stockyard, securely fenced, also a never failing and plentiful supply of good water.

Possession can be had on the first day of July next ensuing Rent Moderate.

For further particulars. enquire of the proprietor. John Tindall. Senior, Esq , Penrith ; or of E. FOULKES, at Mr. Titterton's, next door to the Savings Bank, George  Street

February 5. 2086

   
 

TO LET.-The   HARTLEY  INN, which will be vacated on the 1st July next, is under offer to LET, at a moderate rent, as a STORE, for which it possesses every possible requisite and accommodation, being  a substantially and commodious built residence, and plentifully supplied, at all seasons, with good water in the vicinity of which is a large and populous neighbourhood, and is well worthy of the attention of any person desirous of keeping a COUNTRY STORE.

Tor further particulars apply to the proprietor, JOHN TINDALL, Esq., Penrith ; or to E Foulkes at Mr. Tittertton's, next door to the Savings' Bank, George-street. 7871 

Saturday 12 May 1849

Advertising
The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842-1954) Saturday 12 May 1849 p 4 Advertising
Advertising
The Sydney Morning Herald (NSW : 1842-1954) Monday 12 February 1849

p 4 Advertising

TO LET, the HARTLEY INN, at Hartley, containing sixteen spacious room's, with detached kitchen, and possessing] every  possible requisite for a first-rate Inn, and  has been occupied as such since it was erected,vii., about ten years ; has an excellent twelve-  stall stable, a good garden, with paddocks and stockyard, securely fenced, also a never failing and plentiful supply of good water.

Possession can be had on the first day of | July next ensuing. . Bent Moderate.

For further partieulaia. 'enquire of the pro- prietor. JOHN XnroXix, Senior, Esq., Penrith ; or of E. FotJLKBS, at Mr. Titterton's, next , door to the Savings'Bank, George-street,

"February 5.-' 2086

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The Inn subsequently was  leased to James Young from 1843 to 1858

William Brown was indicted for stealing two watches, the property or Mr. James Young, publican at Hartley, in August last.

Saturday 12 September 1857

REWARD.-LOST, ╗Black MARE, with blane 3D_═ In taee, near hind foot white, white on off hind foot, branded llover 69 near shoulder, and TJ on near hip. The above reward will be pild on delivery to Mr, James Young, Hartley or to the undesigned, at Penrith. ROBERT T. JAMISON

Wednesday 3 February 1858

 

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The Portrait

John Tindale (1809-1872), landowner, was born in Warwickshire and came to Sydney at the age of 11 to join his father, a convict who had been transported to NSW in 1812. The senior Tindale received a free pardon in 1816, and after leaving the King's School in Parramatta, his son was able to develop farming enterprises around Bathurst. He married Mary Wybrow in 1830 and they had several children. By the time these portraits were commissioned, the couple was wealthy, and Tindale's landholdings increased through the following decades. However, the marriage broke up in the late 1840s and in the 1860s Tindale's health failed. In 1870 Tindale moved to New Town, Tasmania, where a couple of years later he shot himself at the rear of his home, Clydeville House.

The Artist

Maurice Felton was born in England and trained as a surgeon in Glasgow before emigrating to Sydney in 1839. He exhibited some paintings a few months after his arrival, and soon became friendly with art patron Alexander Brodie Spark and artist Conrad Martens. After painting several portraits of Spark's family, Felton gained a number of portrait commissions and for a brief period he was the foremost portraitist in New South Wales. Between early 1840 and early 1842 he exhibited portraits and landscapes made in Sydney and its surrounding areas. In the year these portraits were painted, the Sydney Morning Herald reported that 'the prominent way in which Mr Felton brings out his figures from the canvas, both faces and bust, gives them a fulness and a rotundity very opposite to the pasteboard flatness of some otherwise good artists'. Felton died of unknown causes in March 1842. Until they were acquired by the National Portrait Gallery, these were thought to be the only works by Maurice Felton remaining in private hands.